Camel milk chocolate: Moving from the desert to the dessert table

Camel milk chocolate: Moving from the desert to the dessert table

Camel milk chocolate: Moving from the desert to the dessert table

Like all chocolate, camel milk chocolate starts with the cocoa bean. After roasting the bean, the cocoa nib is removed from the husk and placed in a conch - a mixing machine that promotes flavour through frictional heating.

Al Nassma uses only locally sourced camel milk which comes from the Camelicious camel farm across the road from the factory. Scientists say camel milk is as close as you can get to human breast milk.

According to Eurone news

Van Almsick explains why only powdered milk is used in the chocolate-making process.

"Milk contains 90 per cent water and water doesn't go along well with the cocoa butter of the cocoa bean," he says. "Into the mix is added acacia, honey, sugar, bourbon vanilla and dollops of cocoa butter. We want to make this chocolate from top ingredients and vanilla is one of them, acacia honey another. But of course, the camel milk powder as well."

Al Nassma produces on average 300kg of chocolate per day which is exported to several countries all over the globe from San Diego to Sydney. It is available in such fine food establishments as Harrods or Selfridges in London or Julius Meinl am Graben in Vienna.

The company says there is now a growing market in east Asia where around 35% of their customers are based

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